The Nonintuitive Bits

Between Pages and Pixels: Books, AI, and the Quest for a Richer Life

September 08, 2023 Season 1 Episode 60
The Nonintuitive Bits
Between Pages and Pixels: Books, AI, and the Quest for a Richer Life
Show Notes Transcript Chapter Markers

In today's episode powered by the Leaders Club, join hosts Dmitry, Nishant and Slava , as we traverse fascinating landscapes of AI, work cultures, gaming and much more.

Explore the intricacies of AI with gripping discussions on Python and Go languages in AI; weighing Go over Python, owing to project constraints. Delve into the mammoth function of AI in network security, shedding light on its potential misuse in orchestrating personalised attacks and innovative keyword caller identity validation as a precautionary measure.

Join us as we navigate the exciting world of global work cultures. From the European experiment with a four-day work week to the stringent Chinese '9 and 6' work protocol, calling for a 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. commitment six days a week - uncover the diverse range of work ethics practised worldwide. Don't miss the intriguing anecdotes from 'Black Saturday' in Soviet Union post World War II and array of unique workplace practices found across the globe.

In our leisure segment, we dive into the world of gaming with Fort Solis's timed demo, the exclusive Starfield and the unusual case of Rockstar Games betting on 'pirated' versions. Then, we end with an enticing detour into the film world with critical reviews of the 'One Piece' series on Netflix and an immersive account of the film 'Oppenheimer' in 70mm at IMAX.

Closing the discussion, we examine the efficacy of podcast summary technologies such as Buzzsprout’s co-host feature, Fathom and a custom script. For our listeners keen on keeping the conversations going, we warmly extend an invitation to join our [discord channel discussions](https://discord.gg/T38WpgkHGQ).

Don't miss this insightful deep-dive into the realms of AI, work cultures and entertainment, revealing splendid intersections of technology, work ethics and recreation.

artwork generated by: insomnia.land

Speaker 1:

Hello everyone. This is the second attempt to start the non-intuitive beat podcast today and it's, as usually brought to you by Leaders Club, that you are part two if you are listening to us, but do consider awaiting your club membership by joining the Discord and Discord channel link can be found in the description and, as usual today with me in this virtual studio we have several folks Dmitry Mananikov do say hi to our listeners and Nishan Sharma and, as usual, the most annoying sound that you will be hearing, it's my voice, slava Kablevsky. I think this is the first time three of us in this season together. I don't think there was more than two people at any of the episodes.

Speaker 3:

I think so I only did once with you.

Speaker 1:

You mean in this season? Yeah, got it, got it, okay. Okay, we have tons of the interesting topic today that have happened and for the warm up there is so many small things that I wanted to share with both of you folks. But does anyone have anything to share before we jump to the warm up topic? Something small, interesting that have happened.

Speaker 3:

We have a list of books. I see I can talk about one I found recently. It's called the Art of Sinking. Clearly it's very similar to famous thinking fast and slow, but it's more on practical side. Essentially it's a pretty small book, maybe 150 pages. It's about different biases and for each bias it's two or three pages and then cross links between them. The author mentions that he created this book as a list of personal notes about his own biases and then he organized and decided why not to make a book. So it's actually pretty cool. It's like a small pocket book that I can get back and check. Is it something I have right now? Again, it's not really heavy on science side and many things you know, but it's nice to have this well organized, so can recommend it. Especially it's not really expensive.

Speaker 3:

And it has audio version, so if you want, yeah, true, not sure how audio version would be better, because, again, it's really nice as a cooking book. You know, like, okay, what I have today, you can open it and see that made you be audio as well.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, by the way, nishan just mentioned that we have a blur video. So, dmitri, would you also say that we have a blur video? This is just download speed on the Nishan side.

Speaker 3:

Do you mean on YouTube?

Speaker 1:

Already.

Speaker 2:

On the screen that Slava is sharing that panel. Oh yeah, that one is blurry, okay.

Speaker 1:

Okay, I have no idea what YouTube folks are, but anyway, I abruptly ended the live stream and they have to found the second live stream, so there is a chance that no one will be listening live anyway. But who knows, who knows? We'll see how it will go and honestly, I have no idea what to do about this. I have no clue how to fix that. Actually, let me quickly start to stop sharing and present again. Maybe, maybe, somehow this will fix, but I don't think so.

Speaker 3:

Good old, turn it off and.

Speaker 1:

Exactly, yes, yes, I think it's the same Jesus. Okay, then I don't know what to do about it. Yeah, we will have just to live with it. Honestly, I don't know how it looks on the YouTube. Maybe I will double check, but I'm pretty sure it will be the same. Blur it there, I guess. Now I just have to do it. Okay, so anything else about this book, my friend, because I actually also have a book to share, since we are book sharing in a book sharing mood.

Speaker 3:

No, I'm halfway through this book again. I just wanted it was something that I searched for a long time. I found, but whoever wants to read just need to read the annotations and to see it. But something I can't really say. It's great book, it's like practical.

Speaker 1:

It's reasonable book to share.

Speaker 1:

Okay, I just just check the YouTube. It's fine, it's not blurry there. So whatever Meets is doing, it's doing the shitty job, but, yes, it's reasonable on the YouTube. Okay. So, coming back to the book topics, then let me also share one, and that would be. I'm quickly searching the notes. I have no idea where I put it. Okay, I cannot find the show notes, so let me just find it live. And what is our problem? This is a book that I start reading. I haven't finished it.

Speaker 1:

So the really famous guy Wait by why? Tim Urban, that have a blog post. He got famous about many, many different techniques on how to be more productive, how to fight procrastination. He has a famous blog Wait by, but why? Sorry, not the what, wait but why where he showcasing tons of the interesting topics and really deep way and really nice cartoon ish he did. He did a famous that talk about procrastination, monkey, that I highly would recommend everyone to watch if you have not. And recently he have released the book. Actually know how recently? I learned about it recently, but maybe it was not that that recently, I don't know when he released, but the point is the book is there and maybe I'm just slowpoke and maybe you are as well if you haven't heard about it.

Speaker 1:

So, yeah, what is the problem? So let me give you the small spoiler. It's really small because it's the beginning of the book and you can kind of then then read the rest of yourself. But it's really small starting point. So he like to visualize everything. So when he starts the book he's visualizing the problem the following way imagine that the history of the humanity is a book. A all the known humanity and everything that humanity did is just one big book and, in reality, everything that you know about the humanity and humanity as you know, it is just the last one page.

Speaker 1:

The previous 999 pages is what have happened before the US or what we can see in the modern, modern civilization. And you can take person from any of these previous 999 pages and put the same person on any other page and the person would be comfortable. Nothing have changed. Really, it doesn't matter whether you're moving this person in several pages forward or backward. The person will see the exactly same things around that he or she can adopt to.

Speaker 1:

But if you take the person from previous 999 pages to the last page, the person will not survive because everything have changed drastically and this is mostly because of the exponential growth of the technology. And now the final touch to that exponential growth makes everything bigger. So we have a bigger good things and we have much bigger wars, things, the wars. And you know, we just cross 8 billion population on the on our planet and then going to cross 9 billion population. Everything have happened on the last page that we are actually part of it right now. So it's doesn't make much to figure out where we're going from here and how fast we probably will get there. It's just a question how fast we'll get to this. I don't know, doomsday, if you want to something like that. So this is a premises. You will read this on the first 20 pages. So and the rest, the rest of the book is answered this question what is our problem?

Speaker 3:

okay, but does it provide any solution?

Speaker 1:

I will let you know when I finish it, reading it so.

Speaker 3:

I'm not asking what is solution, but if it's not there, it seems like very sad. To be fair, I'm just gonna say maybe the answer is not the doomsday.

Speaker 2:

Maybe the answer is we need to start expanding tomorrow's sooner, you know yep, yep.

Speaker 1:

To be fair, if we as a humanity with only kill one planet, I would be considering this underachievement of our, of our abilities. We are capable of killing and messing up way more planet than just one. But yes, to be fair, even though I haven't read the book yet, I read several assays on this topic and they are completely different, from different angles, from different ways of solving that. But unfortunately, almost everything that I ever read about this specific philosophical topics results in the conclusion that we need to have a some type of force that will unite humanity in one solution that can be implemented, and that is a fact to this famous, famous nice dictator who will solve all our problems and feels like this is unfortunate reality, where we either will die or we have to make.

Speaker 1:

Imagine this future where us even us suddenly realizing that we are have one month left. Unless in one month we will do something, we will reach a point of no returns and then the only way to actually enforce that that's something that need to be done. But this is a starting of dictatorship and there will be no way way back. And it's sad, but I don't know. I I'm sure I will not survive until that day comes, but good luck to everyone after me anyway. Any thoughts?

Speaker 2:

not directly related to the book, but it did remind me. The whole conversation about Mars reminded me that if you sign up for Starlink, there is a clause in their terms of conditions that basically says users must agree that Mars is a free planet unbound by the authority or sovereignty of any earthbound government.

Speaker 1:

This is hilarious.

Speaker 3:

It's actually would be cool to see like real you know court case when like judge declining someone to have a rights on Mars because they actually bought a Starlink 20 years ago or something.

Speaker 1:

You know I have this repo. I need to find it quickly, jesus. I don't remember the name of this repo, but it's a license. On one of my repositories on GitHub I wrote the license that says that if I have not put a license to any of my code this is the license explicitly says that US government can use my code for any reasons and no one who forks it can forbid the US government to use this for any reasons. Yeah, I can quickly find it, but yes, anyway like a small story of space and books.

Speaker 3:

I think it was a three-body problem book. There was like a short story that someone gifted a distant star to a girl just as a you know, like a certificate or something. But after many, many years people actually start to consider moving to stars and he sold this like for like, oh, she sold it for a lot of money because people actually wanted like legal binding.

Speaker 1:

Man, just to keep going on that front. And there is this show on TV Apple TV Plus. Apple TV Plus tomorrow, tomorrow. And this is a show Hello tomorrow, yes, hello tomorrow.

Speaker 1:

If you have watched Morning Show, it has one of the stars of the Morning Show from Apple TV Plus who is there, and the whole idea of that is they are selling houses on the moon and the people who are selling houses on the moon there in this ratry of futuristic world, if you play it, fall out. They clearly build a universe around the fallout. They could have done an amazing job, but they did a really shitty TV series. I wouldn't recommend anyone to watching it just for the sake of your sanity. Horrible things and especially horrible because they're using really nice actors who are much better in other shows, like Morning Show, where the several guys from here are playing an amazing role there. They're completely horrible here. But the TLDR they're selling things on the moon and obviously they probably have guess by now. There is nothing on the moon. They don't have property, they haven't built anything. They're just selling that shit and trying to convince everyone that there is a property on the moon.

Speaker 3:

So they're not selling future. They're selling like not selling future constructions. They're selling something that doesn't exist.

Speaker 1:

Correct. Yes, they started selling future, obviously, and this is a world where this is theoretically possible the humanity constantly flying on the moon and there is a base there, and they actually have a project there, and you actually can buy the property on the moon, you can build something there. But in reality, they fail to do everything and they just selling bullshit that doesn't exist. Yes, that is hello tomorrow. Okay, anything else from anyone. Before we jump to the main, one of the main topics tonight, but honestly, these also I think we can go on books, on and on, yeah, I can?

Speaker 2:

I can toss in one book as well.

Speaker 1:

Go for it.

Speaker 2:

Absolute horrible title but pretty good content. The book is called I'll teach you to be rich. It's in the show notes as well. The premise is that most people majority of the people do not have their finances figured out and the book is really trying to help you figure out that like 80 20 rule I think in the book the author refers to 85% rule and it's really just trying to help you automate as much of your finances as possible and like get you off some of the bad banks that like are known to be bad for customers and stuff.

Speaker 2:

And for you to figure out what is your rich life like. It could be like some people. It's like the American dream buying a house. And then it's the like the author really challenges you to think why do you want to buy a house? Because renting could be better in some circumstances. And then like figuring out what things make you happy consciously spend where you do spend but then like automate your savings. So it's really just about walking you through six weeks program. And the reason I found this book is the guy also has a show called I'll teach you to be rich on Netflix. It's a decent time pass, so it was running on the background. So we decided to check out the book on like drives and stuff and pretty reasonable. I didn't pick up a thing or two, but I would say definitely, if you're a beginner and you're like thinking about getting control of your financial life, this is a great book to get started with.

Speaker 3:

When I've seen the name I thought like the book would be about how to write a book and sell one million copies and then get rich from it, but apparently it's more useful.

Speaker 1:

You know what is that famous district in LA where rich people live, beverly Hills. Beverly Hills, one of the and there used to be a quite popular saying in Ukraine that any book how to be productive or successful, is a guy from Beverly Hills teaching the guy from Kiev that he should go outside of his comfort zone to become successful? But to be fair, I do love books like that, so I probably will. Actually, I will end it to my to to read least. I love things like that.

Speaker 2:

I all into investment, but now I have to also recommend the audiobook Slava if you're going to get something. The guy is also a podcaster, so the audiobook is super easy to listen to, like one of the easiest to listen to books. It's like guys just in his podcast reading his book.

Speaker 3:

He's reading his own book.

Speaker 2:

Yes, yes, and I think that's the cool.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, by the way, what is our problem? What is the problem? They also was narrated by Tim Urban himself. So, yes, I love this tendency when the authors actually narrate in their book. But I have to ask Nishan, so what's your preference? Are you renting or buying? Which group are you in renters or buyers?

Speaker 2:

Trying to put it on rent.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that that makes sense. That makes sense, okay, okay, so let's jump to next topics. So the bus crowds have released. We discuss this. Last time they released the AI AI for building the narrative, for building the whatever I don't remember yes, so we last time discussed that they build the cohost AI. This piece of software is incredibly bad. I would not recommend it to anyone. I finally have tried it. I honestly my plan was like that I would try it and then I would build my own pipeline. They're doing that shit and I will just move to my pipeline. I tried it.

Speaker 3:

It was so explain for me and other people who have no idea what it is.

Speaker 1:

Well, this is because you skipped the last episode where you discussed this. But yes, yes, of course. So the TLDR, you're uploading your episode to the bus crowds and generate show notes, proposing five titles to you, proposing time sections of your podcast, proposing tags, social media posts. So everything for you, which is a really nice idea until you see how it works. It's horrible. It generates too many unnecessary buzzwords for your episode.

Speaker 1:

If I would be reading show notes that it generated, I would not be listening to that specific show just because it's so high level, so buzzwordy that just losing any meaning. So in fact, after that I used it. Unfortunately I don't have the version that it generated. But then I completely redesigned pipeline, created on scratch. I started using Whisperer for converting podcasts to text and then effectively pipeline that generating show notes. And in doing so I had to figure out how to apply MapReduce concept for generating show notes, because it turns out that the text of the podcast is too big to feed to GPT. You cannot just feed the whole podcast to the GPT, so I have to implement this small library that I did Let me quickly show it which effectively takes the idea of the MapReduce and I'm planning the concept classical MapReduce concept to the LLMs.

Speaker 1:

You can specify LLM, you can specify text, you can specify the actual prompt and what will do? It will do the classical MapReduce. It will chunk it and fully chunk. It will send it to GPT and says here is a chunk of the text, here is the end goal and this is chunk number one. Can you summarize this chunk of the text with any information needed in the context of this goal? It will generate this chunk and then you're doing reduces, where you're taking chunks that are generating and then asking okay, here's two chunks from part number one, part number two, can you merge it and create the chunk with them? So it's first doing the mapping, then reducing and then at the end it builds the final chunk that allows it to build the show notes from the bigger podcast that we have. It works actually.

Speaker 3:

How do you chunk it? Do you buy paragraphs by sentences or just randomly?

Speaker 1:

It's literally chunks on the size of the context. So right now it's even hardcoded somewhere in the code, somewhere in the code where it's chunk with the size of 8000 tokens, not the token's characters, but it's chunks. It's a small code and I already can find this hardcoded value. And the thing is that if you're subtracting it, okay, split, here is a split, and if you're subtracting it, oh yeah, it's dynamic, okay anyway, but to answer your question, so I'm literally splitting the whole string, but I'm doing overlap. So if you do overlap, you kind of, if you split in the middle of the sentence, you just need one chunk to go slightly further, another chunk to go slightly backwards, and then both of them will have split in the middle of the sentence but at the same time you end up with having full coverage because it will be different sentences that got split and it works amazingly well.

Speaker 1:

In fact, there is only one feature that's missing here. I actually do not add right now on the reduced steps number of the chunk. So it's actually not capable to derive which part was in the beginning of the show, which part was in the end, because when I do a reduction, it doesn't know this chunk from the beginning or from the middle, from the end. So that was a miss. I need to implement that. Probably next. We can't, but it's working surprisingly well. It's like literally classical MapReduce and, by the way, this MapReduce was written by Copilot, so to some extent it's even AI that wrote that, not even me. But yes, that's a jailed yard, so feel free to use folks. It's very simple. It has pre-prompt for how to do Map, how to do Reduce and yada, yada and it's in Go. So, yes, not in Python, because, fuck you, that's why. That's the reason why not in Python.

Speaker 3:

Anyway, sorry, the tool I recently built to help me with chatgpt. I have to write in Python because library is in Python and I'm not very reverse in Python, so I have to use chatgpt to generate all the code and then copy paste errors and saying, hey, please fix it.

Speaker 1:

You know I picked Go because several One of the teams in the org that I'm helping to support. They have an effort going that they have to implement in Go, so I kind of needed to make sure that if I needed there I will know Go. I ended up writing several projects in Go. Now I more or less understand the language, but I did zero code reviews in Go for the team and I did zero feature implementation for the team. So it's to some extent was wasted effort and if I knew that I would fail to help the team with a Go, I probably would do it in Python as well, because it's obviously reducing amount of people who would be using that just because not many people using chatgpt and the programming in Go. That's where a weird niche. Anyway, anyway, that was Go for it.

Speaker 2:

So this is great what you did here. Just for the sake of comparison, I wonder if you should try Fathom to do the summary for one of your podcasts so you can compare Go, host Fathom and your own script and we can see, like for one of the podcasts, like what do you get?

Speaker 1:

How do you know that the person is working in a company that does have a budget? Because the person doesn't know that the tool has a price tag of. Please contact our sales department and we will be in touch with you. So I would love to use your suggestions, but I have no clue even how to install it. I literally tried, and you know that the only price I have is contact us. That's the price.

Speaker 3:

It probably means like million dollars.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I guess. Yes, I don't know really how, how much. But yes, nishan is right, I'm pretty sure that Fathom will do much better job. Like, I'm pretty sure it will do much better job, I just have no clue how to use it. Okay, does anyone want to talk about anything else? Otherwise, I'll be keep chatting and keep moving forward with a full steam on other topics.

Speaker 3:

Let's move to the next one.

Speaker 1:

Oh my God, I was hoping someone will say something Okay, let's go. Let's go to the next one. One of the hobbies that recently picked up is Hugs the Box. It's an extremely interesting service that, if you are accustomed to things like lead or hacker rank, this is a very similar thing. But for the security the reason I picked it up it's mostly I do honestly believe that with the current development of the AI, security will be the next frontier, just because of how everything is moving, where everything is moving.

Speaker 1:

All the friends of mine who are in the security field telling that amount of the black swan events that can bring down the internet are exponentially growing.

Speaker 1:

They used to have one per year, now they're having one per each second week where they need to do emergency patching, like on the magnitude that someone will figure out how to exploit this. We are all doomed, so to speak. So a lot of the stuff that security folks in the industry, especially the networking space, are telling just emphasizing importance of that. We have a lot of people on the hacking side and we have a lot of people on the AI side, but we almost have zero people who are on the both sides who can figure out how to apply AI to the low level, true real-world hacking problems. It's not that far away the moment where these two fields will interchange. I don't know what it will be, but probably the same magnitude of impact that we are having with ChargeGPT. So I just want to refresh my skills on some of the low level networking security and to do so I found this hack the box thing.

Speaker 3:

How does it work? Do you get a task to complete, or how it works.

Speaker 1:

Actually, yes, it's literally exactly like that. You're searching the topic about scanning ports, scanning vulnerabilities, scanning networking, and then they are spinning up via machine that you have, quote-unquote, to hack and times of time. You are spending days to figure out how to apply knowledge that I just figure out to hack that machine, and they do it in a clever way. They're trying to sell you a subscription, but it works in the way that they give you enough internal coins I don't remember the name of this coin so we can purchase the lesson and then, when you progress, if you're finishing the homework, and if you will finish all the homework, they will give you barely enough credit to purchase the next course. But if you're even behind on, one task Battle Passes and Games.

Speaker 1:

Exactly, yes, exactly like that. Yes, it reminds me exactly that that's a clever really nice. I so far loved it. I have not skipped even one homework, not because I love all of them, but just because anyone to pay them. But eventually, maybe one day, I don't know- One of these notes.

Speaker 3:

Actually, a lot of people talk about AI in terms of like securities and we can give you some source code for macOS and we'll find vulnerabilities which are zero-day right.

Speaker 3:

But I think there are another idea where AI can actually hurt us without going to source code level.

Speaker 3:

We accumulated a huge amount of personal data everywhere Photos, geolocations, our relations to other people, our behaviors, and right now you know, like this, when you say someone hey, don't post your personal photos because people can attack you, usually responses I'm not a superstar, I'm not a politician, no one cares about me. But with AI, it became much cheaper to target usual people, like regular people, and I'm always thinking about scenarios what if found, like all people who are going to vacation next week, who has old parents in a different country, who has a particular bank account, and we also know like some person leave about them, and we have a nice voice examples to make a generated. Now we can make these attacks Okay, call their parents, ask for money because we are in trouble during our I don't know sailing event or our vacation, and, if you like, just make it automatically scattered across the world like it's can be actually like very impactful in people's lives, without even like going to some zero day hiking and things. What do you think?

Speaker 1:

Especially with the language modeling. I want to say to our listeners I did with my old folks and I was highly encouraged to do this. Well, go and design the keyword or sneakers or something, and tell your parents that if you calling in your own voice, not from the phone number that you have, unless you will say that keyword it's not you, this is a reality. If you're listening and think, ah, that's a bullshit, that will not happen to me. Well, I would highly suggest you consider going develop a keyword and go and share it with your old folks, and that's the level of protection you have to do. There is no other way.

Speaker 3:

I would say, going like every time, maybe too much, but at least if there's a situation when someone asks money from you. Just you need some confirmation 100%.

Speaker 2:

There have been cases of like people, exactly like getting the voice modulation right and everything. And you have to have those keywords.

Speaker 2:

And especially you're your topic of bringing it to personal privacy. Things just reminded me of a study that just came out from the Mozilla group. Slava added the link to the show notes. They reviewed different car companies privacy policies and, if you like, scroll down a little bit and there's like all sorts of ranking and Tesla is the worst one, if you didn't know. They like track everything, but what no one expected. Nissan is the creepiest one. They claim right to your sexual activity, and Kia also mentions that they collect information about your sex life in their privacy policy. Oh, and six car companies say that they collect your genetic information or genetic characteristics. How Like how.

Speaker 2:

So here's what I have to think. I am fuzzy on details now because this happened a while ago Because I signed up for some service. In the clause it said because you signed up for us, you are giving us permission to pull data from Verizon or T-Mobile. Like me, signing up for service allowed them to ask Verizon for all the information. They had that contract, but I had to sign up for the service. So I wonder if there's more of these behind the scene contracts. As soon as you buy the car, you sign that contract. You now just said, yes, you are allowed to pull my information. So maybe they now can buy it from 23andMe and you cannot sue them for doing that because you said it's okay.

Speaker 3:

It could be like companies doing. It reminds me like long like story that pop ups couple of years ago. So people analyzed a particular TV I don't remember what brand it was, but it was pretty much no name brand which is very cheap. It makes a shitty TV, but you know like sometimes people just need whatever is showing a picture. The trick it was they were selling this TV less than manufacturing price and when they tried to do why it's, why is this actually business, right, apparently they they get. They got more money from advertising and selling like what, what you actually watching then from TV itself. It was a pretty interesting case as well.

Speaker 1:

I think it was from Duro for someone who did a telegram, I think. But yes, yes, I was trying to find a landing for one of the startups that I deeply involved. I honestly remember the name and don't remember the landing page, but the fact that the whole idea that you would have a service that collects your data and then you're selling it to anyone who wants to learn about you. So you're no longer giving it to anyone and obviously I don't believe that any of such startups will persevere to the level that they need to or want to but the idea is nice that you willingly giving it to like. We all give our password to one password, right? We trusting that company. So imagine the company that we can trust with our personal data that will keep it secure and we actually in control of giving access to this personal data. We can see the data exactly and we can decide which part of the data will go to each company. And then you're walking to the target and target tells you oh, I will give you 25% discount.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, but then you need to also trust all these companies right. Every time you sell to target, you expect them not to lose your data, the piece you gave them.

Speaker 1:

True, but now you're in control, you can decide not to. It's exactly this is the point. You now have the in control of your data, and this is a different story. If you don't trust, you don't have to sell. Today they are buying our data from providers behind our back and nothing we can do.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, that's, that's true.

Speaker 2:

There is also a TV that literally comes with a second screen for ads, but you get the TV for free.

Speaker 3:

Like okay, that's really like from black mirror show.

Speaker 1:

Tell me. Yes, that's the one that I was referring to. That I think from the telegram. Nope, I might be wrong. Yes, that's the one I was referring to. Yes, oh man, that's, that's hilarious. Yes.

Speaker 3:

Can I put just like a bottom advertising screen on my wall and then start earning money from it?

Speaker 1:

Without the TV, just watching it right, there is something to it, you know there is something to it. Like maybe an up for the iPad, the app. If you're opening that up, it will turn on the camera to watch you to make sure that it's actually in the living room that people are actually passing by, and then it will start give you some money for any person that passed by. So it's not the cameras turn out, so it can use cybervision to effectively figuring out that there are people passing by. It can show the ads on the main screen. So, yeah, there is something to it that we can together, collectively bring this humanity to the end much faster than we thought in the beginning of the show. We just need to brainstorm more. Anyway, anyway, there is several things else to discuss, but any other things that someone have recalled before we jump to.

Speaker 3:

I can talk about games, but I see you put Starfield as well, so I think we can.

Speaker 1:

It would be enough for one show to be fair, I have not played Starfield. I know it's out. I know that someone in my house is a special Starfield constellation edition. I know that, but I don't have it yet.

Speaker 3:

But somewhere in my house, somewhere, I can talk in spite of advertising a bit, so I on the PlayStation. There is a way to play trials for games like and it's time time based like one hour, five hours, 30 minutes, depend on the game. And recently I started to play Fort Solis, which is and it has like one hour demo. It's unconstrained, but you just have one hour and the game essentially is walking simulator. You know, you just walk, do something and game put in a general like you are a technical and a map station. There is no one. You know like a bit spooky, but nothing really happening. And they did so good on timing. The first one hour like you go from not spooky to almost spooky, and the last moment, when I started to see something spooky, the game ended because, like my one hour left. It's probably the best advertisement I ever get, because they got me hooked in the exact moment and now I'm considering to buy it, which is very, very smart decision and I haven't seen it like before. It's it's really good timing they did.

Speaker 1:

But it's really hard to do because each player will, unless there is that's what I'm saying.

Speaker 3:

it's not. I mean, it's kind of linear because you walk like pretty much on corridors like open doors, but you still, you know, can stay. You can read something, I don't know how, maybe, maybe I just was lucky. Like other people don't do it, I'm pretty sure you can just stay and don't get this effect, but for me it works well. Maybe they just did a lot of play test and see like this is an average time when people get to this room.

Speaker 1:

Okay, does it come to Xbox exclusive? I swear son is going door to door offering blah, blah, blah, blah, blah. So does it or does it not? I don't have a lease for Xbox. I hate you. I hate you. Why? Why are you doing this to me? You know that I have Xbox. You first saw the game I want to play and it doesn't exist in Xbox.

Speaker 3:

Okay, okay so are you going to buy it or not? Maybe you know, like I'm, an age and the time where money is not constrained but decision to spend time on the game is a constraint. So I will think about it, got it, got it, got it.

Speaker 2:

Okay, I think we can all start advocating for that for the week. That's happening in Europe, at least in some places. Countries have started experimenting with that, so we can reclaim one day for week for gaming.

Speaker 1:

Tell me, tell me more. What is that? And it's not. You are muted. You are muted, but I'm pretty sure you're telling something awesome.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, yeah, so I'm using push to talk, and then I started searching on the side. I think it was either France or some Nordic country. They were experimenting with four day work weeks last year and I think the results for promising is what I remember reading. But if you don't find it now, I'll have it ready for the next podcast and we can follow up on this.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, for the week.

Speaker 2:

Right now is is also advocating for that, bernie Sanders.

Speaker 1:

Oh, bernie Sanders, oh, that socialist guy. Okay, yes, sure, yes, as you see, in his age, even if US will go under, he probably will not, will not survive till that moment. So I am, but I know, you know who else went to four days week. That was the green up for the note taking with elephant as a main, as a main symbol. I'm pretty sure you ever not, ever not, yes, ever not, was a famous company that went to four days week for working, for days working week. Are they still around?

Speaker 3:

I think they went under, I think they sold some people just can migrate from it and they stuck.

Speaker 1:

Maybe yes, yes, but to be fair, I don't mind. Of course I don't mind. Unless it's my startup, then I do mind my startup. No, advocating to go to six, six days per week is a working norm, but yes, that's. That's a different story.

Speaker 3:

You will have to move your business to China.

Speaker 2:

I mean the whole premise is that people are more productive over four days, then then six days, I guess over long periods of time. That's true in a, in a short time you can do.

Speaker 3:

I think the main issue is like, if government enforces it, it's not making people more productive because it goes like across all. Like if work is a you know moving something from left to right, you probably will be more product. Like you will do more in more days, right, depending on a job. Thank you.

Speaker 2:

Yeah, for sure. If it's like physical labor thing, I cannot do six days of labor in four days.

Speaker 3:

If it's thinking, jobs and creativeness, maybe I don't have one extra day, will spend playing games. It's actually interesting topic because I think, like four days week, it will come eventually, but not because people care about productivity, just like. We have so many people and we automate so many things, so just need to keep people somehow busy. But we don't have job enough for everyone unless we start building pyramids or something or go to Mars in other pyramid.

Speaker 1:

You know, even though it's the people more productive, you can fix it by the other way, you can help more people If you have bigger amount of people pool. That's different things and that's remind me about culture. Nine and six, that's the resume and website and GitHub rapper. So this is quite popular in the China. So that's why the China Chinese walks created the huge project nine and six ICU, with a list of companies that support this. So nine and six is you working from nine am till nine pm, six days a week. So that's what money, what it means. Culture nine and six and obviously this was a cause leading cause to many death in China, where this is actually actively employed, because, especially if you're doing creative job, in you being forced to keep doing, creating job nine to nine, without the weekends, yes, it can lead to a lot of complications to your psychological life.

Speaker 3:

Yeah, my grandma told me like after war in like second World War in Soviet Union, there was like a lot of distractions and a lot of factories closed and they need to rebuild everything and they have working Saturdays, but not every working Saturday, I think it was like once per month. And people call it a black Saturday because it's like a six days and for me it was like kind of norm because they understand what they're doing, but it was still like extra day time to time.

Speaker 1:

When you, oh, nishan, go for it. I saw you are immediately yourself, Go for it.

Speaker 2:

Oh, I was gonna just link it to something else, so if you want to finish first, I wanted to say something, but already forgot, so you go.

Speaker 2:

I saw a video, I think that came out of Japan, where the office had like really nice setups for like you could sleep and everything and everyone was going. Oh, that's so sweet for the employer. But then, like then someone was like actually, if you're spending 72 hours or 80 hours a week, that is, that becomes more of a necessity than like a perk that the employer is providing if you're literally just spending your life in the office. So that's kind of what 996 reminds me of.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, that's. That's remind me now when you said this, when I used to work used to be working one big company from the South Korea I've spent tons of the time in South Korea and then you, they used to have a dermatoreal right next to the office so you, you can go there and sleep it would you have to pay for it something? And that's what. That was horrible, like what's really really horrible.

Speaker 3:

It was work from home.

Speaker 2:

What do you think about Twitter offices opening like semi hotel in the building itself? You don't even have to go to the building next door.

Speaker 3:

It's the members of stories, like people from Google sleep in events on a parking lot, so they don't need to pay a friend.

Speaker 1:

You know. That story, by the way, is true, but this is for old, old Google and it got famous back in the day. But now people telling him in context that they don't want to pay a rent in reality, when that was actually extremely popular. That was a time when you can live in RV for two years and buy a house, even if you're like a junior in Google so a lot of junior middle engineers were doing so. There was like internal forum where you can ask where to park your. We were. The security is not often comes around. You just need to survive two years and you can buy a house in cash. Obviously, the time long gone. No one, no one doing it anymore, but the story is still still still there with us. But yes, it used to be true.

Speaker 3:

It reminds me I was working in a startup in Moscow and I was leaving outside and my commute was like more than one hour. And sometimes if after office I go, like you know, to the bar or somewhere to spend time, it's like super late and I'm too lazy to go for commute. So I went to office like no one is there so I can sleep there and that morning I'm already on the work.

Speaker 1:

Such an amazing story. Yeah, sorry, I was updating the show notes. Okay, I do have just one more thing. That would more or less be enough for the final accord of the evening, but is anyone else want to share anything before I will jump to the movies section?

Speaker 2:

Well, let me say one last thing about games, then, on what happened last week. There was an article that came out that Rockstar Games, which is a pretty big studio in gaming, found to be selling pirated games on Steam, so to get around their own DRM. And then in comments in various places, I think I read one of them the person was talking about they reading out to the company about, like, getting an installer for a game, but the game was old. So the company was like, just go get the pirated version, we don't have the files anymore. But this is pretty crazy that you go on Steam, you think you're buying the real game and the company is just selling your pirated version.

Speaker 1:

Oh my god, this is hilarious. That reminds me who Dima, I think you would remember. There was a game from which they lost all the source code.

Speaker 3:

Oh, it was Heroes of my Might and Magic 3. Right, I remember they actually like they made version for iPad. I was very happy about that and then after some time, I upgraded iOS version and it says like there is no, you can't really play this game because when I start digging, I found that they completely lost all sources so they couldn't really adapt for new version of iPad OS. I think it was that one.

Speaker 1:

Yes, expansion packs were not included because the source code for those releases were lost. Jesus, how they managed to do so, oh my god. Oh my god. I'm pretty sure someone right now rewriting the source code from scratch together with OpenAPR. Here is a screenshot of my game. Can you write, please, a unity code for that screenshot and then doing it from scratch? I'm pretty sure someone somewhere is doing so.

Speaker 3:

It's actually interesting idea, right like what if you give AI a game, you know, just like a control, since I play until you understand how it works, so you can write code for me?

Speaker 1:

Yes and then OK, now make it not say for work as much as you can, let's see how it will look like. Ok, ok for for those type of topics. Let's go to the movies section, and I let me just share several things that are old but I still would like to share them. First is that last song. If you have not watched that last song, I would highly recommend you to do so. But you have to promise to me that you will stop in the season one. It's unbearable to to say how she is a season two and three competing to season one. I yes, usually the TV series. When you probably hearing this, you'll be saying yeah, I know, the season two is always a little bit worse than season one. No, that's a different movie. It's just unbearable to watch. I don't know how they manage this.

Speaker 3:

So I remember you told me because when I finished first one I was like, yeah, it's a good ending. I will not going to watch it.

Speaker 1:

Kudos to you, my friend. You did the right thing, nishant.

Speaker 2:

I mean I have seen all three seasons. I think they picked it up in season three. I really did enjoy season three, so there was, at least you know, some. Come back there.

Speaker 1:

You know there are episodes that are amazing in season two and season three that by them self as a really nice standalone movie that you can watch and, to be fair, if you would start with season two without any prior expectations, that is a decent series by itself. This is a problem comparing with season 1 constantly and, dima, it felt like you were about to say something.

Speaker 3:

Oh no, I just muted myself.

Speaker 1:

Okay, so who is watched recently? Anything new and interesting. Otherwise, I'll just keep going with what I have watched recently.

Speaker 3:

I put one piece there. Mishandra, do you want to talk about something?

Speaker 2:

Sure, I'll go. I just finished watching the after party, season 2. If you have not seen the after party, it is a pretty good show If you are especially into murder mysteries.

Speaker 2:

So there is a murder and then they have a pretty interesting way of, like you know, walking you through each person's story. So the premise is that this police officer really likes to listen to everyone's story because they are the main characters. So you basically get to see a movie each time and then, in the end, like they put everything together and solve the murder. But every episode especially in season 2, was done with like a 50s theme. So it's like everyone has like dramatic takes on, like oh, this is what was going on and it was pretty like I would say like some inspirations from Agatha Christie, kind of who done it? Stuff. But it was a really good season.

Speaker 3:

But if it's a murder mystery, either Cliff Handler in the end of the show or you know who is.

Speaker 2:

They solve the murder in season 1. There is a different murder in season 2, and they solve that too.

Speaker 3:

So they're like disconnected right.

Speaker 2:

Same cast actually, so you I'm not gonna say more than that.

Speaker 1:

It's remind me the Jesus. I forgot the name of the movie, but anyway I may be able to call. I think, dime, you also wanted to say to share something about the movies before I will share some impression about Oppenheimer.

Speaker 3:

Oh no, you already watched it. Yeah, so I watched one piece, couple of episodes on Netflix, just for the context. One piece is a Japanese manga which like really long, and also Japanese anime which started like in 1999 and still going. It's like too long. I never actually watched it because, again, I don't have that time in my life to watch all of it.

Speaker 3:

And the thing about anime is like, usually when it goes to life it's very shitty, like I can't recall any anime that was adopted as a live show and became decent. They all very bad. I think. One decent example was Ghost in the Shell, which was pretty much just converted to Western action movie. But this is very surprisingly like nicely adapted. It still has all this craziness from anime like that would you expect, but for some reason it's like nice to watch it, like decent actors, decent setting and it doesn't try to be serious, like it's pretty much like if we get anime with all this like crazy stuff going on and exegregation of everything and put in a live show and it looks fine, like. I really like it and I can recommend, if you want something like a pretty crazy adventures of pirates. That's a premise.

Speaker 1:

Yeah, I got it probably. I added it on my side to your watch list for me Probably will watch eventually. Thank you, and I in the end do want to share my impressions from the Oppenheimer 50 millimeters film, or 17 on the 50, 70. Yes.

Speaker 3:

Or where did you watch it? In Dublin or in San Francisco?

Speaker 1:

Dublin. Yes, there are like only 12 cinemas in the North America that can show you the proper Oppenheimer and 70 millimeters. You know, by the way, I've seen different views of viewpoints. Some of the folks will tell you that it doesn't have, you, don't have to go to there and it's not actually warrant For me. I definitely would suggest to go and watch specifically 70 millimeters. So what is 70 millimeters? I'm actually will give you a huge, a max screen that can show you the picture in the size of the square, not the little square when X is equal to Y.

Speaker 1:

And what they doing? An Oppenheimer? They showing you three different version of the picture. They showing you the grayscale version, which is a factory. When they show you grayscale, they show you the historical events and they unfold it in real life. When they showing you the color movie in their usual ratio not the square but usual movie ratio on the screen, that would be the classical movie. And periodically they going to the square movie, but the square not in the usual scene on the square would be trimmed from the size to show you a square. In this case it's actually when they showing normal movie. It's trimmed on the top, on the bottom because the I max at K-POP, with 70 millimeters, have a huge square in front of you. So when they going to the third movie, the third mode, so to speak, you suddenly see much bigger screen that you would see in the movie usually and that creates a wall effect. And even more, it creates a continuous and wall effect.

Speaker 1:

And again, again, again, because they only going to the third more mode periodically. So imagine that they showing you a movie and suddenly they want to show you a close up face. So for that face, for the facial expression, they might go to a square when you have a much bigger ability to zoom in. Because if you're zooming in on the classical ratio of the cinema, on someone's face face still in the middle you have tons of the screen useless. In this case they can zoom in and show you face much bigger. And each time when they showing either face or something, they put additional emphasis. And it's just amazing. And again, because they going back and forth and not constantly in this mode, it's create this wall effect again and again and again, because it hits right when you forgot that they even capable of showing you this. And again you're seeing this. Oh my God, yes, that's so cool.

Speaker 3:

So you did like visuals. What about? Like a story plot, actors, everything else Is it there? Or just like so good on visuals that you don't care about other parts?

Speaker 1:

No, I, you know I. So it's amazing movie. They're still there. It is amazing movie. I knew a lot of the story of the uponheimer and because they trying to tell the story to some extent close to the real story, it was just fine and use the story, so to speak. I knew how the bomb made, how it looks like, what was the sequence of a when, how they derived it. So, from that perspective, it's yeah, sure you know the story, they uncovering you a lot of underground parts that shape the story, so to speak. There was one particular moment. It's probably not going to be a big spoiler, it's probably not a spoiler at all, but there was actually. No, I'm not going to tell you. I'm not going to tell you. You have to go and watch it. I don't want to spoil it, but, yes, I love the dialogue. Well, what, what?

Speaker 2:

Thank you, I appreciate not spoiling the movie.

Speaker 1:

Here you go. But it was extremely hard to find the tickets. So we literally were monitoring tickets, which was all sold out for 70 millimeters, constantly until one morning, early morning. We were going with several friends to somewhere, I don't remember where we were going. I just just casually opened the cinema and we see, oh, there is a four tickets 20 minutes from now, at the moment where we leaving, leaving to go there. Someone returned it but nope, we have to go there. 20 minutes is enough to drive there.

Speaker 1:

We came there five minutes late because at 70 millimeters they don't have almost any pre-screen because none of the advertisement are fitting that screen, so they literally starting the movie at the hour. So we arrived five minutes late, expecting that the movie would start 15 minutes late, and we walked into the theater in the middle of the movie because it's already was airing. That was by itself a surprise. So that was a TLGR Highly recommend, highly recommend. Anyway, I actually think we are precisely at one hour, but if someone has anything else to share, please do. Now is the time. Now is the time.

Speaker 3:

I think we're good for today.

Speaker 1:

Okay, so let me move everything to the back lock of the topics and with that, thank you, folks, and we'll chat and see you, all of you, in the same place sometime next week and you folks can say good bye.

Speaker 2:

Goodbye, have a nice weekend everyone. Bye, see you.

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